NETW 1020-P24

Lab Exercise 14 – 10 Points – Due Mar. 15th

 

Virtual memory allows the OS to make use of a HDD (hard disk drive) to simulate RAM. This can be useful when, for instance, the as is running a number of applications and each requires an allocation of RAM reserved for its use. Ideally, the Virtual Memory Manager will protect actual RAM for the applications that are most active by moving the data used by other applications to a swap file on the hard drive. Windows 2000 and Windows XP call the swap file a paging file. The virtual memory default settings allow Windows to manage the paging file as it sees fit, increasing or decreasing its size as needed.

 

In most situations, allowing Windows to manage virtual memory with default settings works just fine, but this practice can cause pauses in application response time when the as switches to an application that has its data stored in the paging file. This delay is caused by the relatively long access time of reading from a drive compared to reading from RAM. This is especially true if the file is on the boot partition or any other parti­tion that is subject to heavy use. In cases where performance has become a problem, you might wish to manually specify virtual memory settings.

 

  1. Log on to Windows 2000 as an administrator.

 

  1. Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to Settings and then click Control Panel. The Control Panel window should open.
  2. Double-click the System icon in Control Panel to open the System Properties dialog box.
  3. Review the information on the General tab and note how much RAM is installed. Click OK to close the System Properties dialog box.

 

  1. Double-click the Administrative Tools icon in Control Panel. The Control Panel window should change to Administrative Tools.
  2. Double-click the Computer Management shortcut in Administrative Tools. The Computer Management snap-in should appear in an MMC.
  3. In the left pane of Computer Management, click Disk Management and review the information displayed in the right pane. List below the required information, then close the MMC and Administrative Tools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit the Microsoft Web site at support.microsoft.com and search the Knowledge Base for the following articles:

 

 

 

 

·       Article 307886: How to Move the Paging File in Windows XP

  • Print and read these articles and answer the following questions:

·  What is the default/recommended size of the paging file?

  • rI

 

Print and read these articles and answer the following questions:

 

·    What is the default/recommended size of the paging file?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attach a copy of the first page of each a these articles to this assignment.

 

Now you will work with the Virtual Memory dialog box to view and record the paging file settings. The official information may not be clear about the recommended maximum size of the paging file. As you record your settings, notice that the maximum size is the same as the recommended size.

 

1.     In Windows 2000 Click the Start button on the taskbar, point to Settings, then click Control Panel.

 

2.     Double-click the System icon in Control Panel. The System Properties dialog box should open.

 

3.     In System Properties, select the Advanced tab.

 

4.     In the Performance section of the Advanced tab, click Performance Options. The Performance Options dialog box should open.

 

5.     In the Performance Options dialog box, click Change. The Virtual Memory dialog box should open. Print a screen shot.

 

6.     Answer the following questions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

o      Recommended:

 

 

 

 

 

 

o      Currently allocated:

 

 

 

 

Custom         System-managed size       No pag­ing file

 

 

6.     Now reboot your system into Windows XP. Open the Virtual Memory dialog box and print a screen shot.

 

7.     List any differences you find from Windows 2000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure your name is on all printouts. Attach them to this assignment and turn everything in to me.